Starting S216: Environmental Science

My S216: Environmental Science course materials have arrived! Cue much rejoicing, general study planning, and a little list-making.

A brief aside on the topic of world maps:

Among the six books and the DVD pack was also a wall map of the Earth’s surface. It’s the Mercator projection, which has always bothered me. People’s sense of geography is not based upon fact, but upon the Mercator map, and has been ever since it was first produced in 1569.

What we think the world looks like...

Representing a spherical object on a flat surface is always going to present problems, but the Mercator projection is not even close to being area accurate… Africa is frickin’ huge. MASSIVE. As is South America. The main problem with this map is that the further the land mass is from the equator, the more its size is distorted. Thus, Greenland becomes a similar size to Africa.

However, in 1855, a clergyman named James Gall produced his own version of a map of the world, known as the Gall-Peters Projection. This has its drawbacks, too, but the areas represented are much more accurate. See – the northern hemisphere is puny in terms of landmass size compared to the south:

How the world really looks...

Back to the books:

Anyway. That’s enough of maps (although I LOVE maps – if anyone wants to buy me antique maps, feel free).

The first block of S216 is a virtual field trip to the Teign Valley in Devon, and is DVD based. Then we’re on to the books, which sound very interesting indeed…

Book 2: Air and Earth.

Part One – Air: We’ll be looking at the atmosphere. It’s cold outside, and there is an atmosphere. I’m all alone, more or less. Then there’s the weather, and weather observations. Followed by the ins and outs of the atmosphere, and the global weather machine including ocean circulation and that pesky El Niño.

Part Two – Earth: Comprising rocks and minerals; igneous rocks; metamorphic rocks; fragmentary rocks; and the weathering of rocks and minerals. Then there’s an introduction to soil – what it is; soil ecosystems; and soil processes and properties in the environment. I’ve got to be honest; this section doesn’t sound so interesting…

Book 3: Water and Life. This is quite an alarmingly thick book.

Part One – Water: All types of water. What happens to rain? Ground water; a journey down a river; and the hydrological cycle. I like water. I’m reading a biography of water at the moment, and it’s bloody fascinating. Water is strange stuff; it doesn’t obey the usual laws of liquids. There is nothing as sweet as water when you’re really, really thirsty.

Part Two – Life: Vegetation patters; resources to support life; and ecological dynamics. This is one of my areas of interest because I am a tree-hugging hippy who wants to save the world, one turtle at a time.

Book 4:  Landforms and Cycles. This is a more reassuringly thin book.

Part One – Landforms: A bit of physical geography, which I loved at school, and which has stayed with me throughout adulthood. The way the Earth’s roots works fascinates me. So we’ll start with plate tectonics and an introduction to landforms, looking at lithology, and how water shapes the landscape inland and at the coasts. Then we look at ice, and wind, and finally landforms in space and time.

Book 5:

  • Extreme weather
  • Atmospheric chemistry and pollution
  • Wetlands and the carbon cycle
  • Cryosphere

Book 6:

  • Oceans and climate (this one, I’m looking forward to)
  • Water quality
  • Eutrophication
  • Acid rain

Book 7:

  • Grasslands
  • Tropical forests
  • Biological conservation

Books 5, 6 and 7 are going to interest me particularly. This is a beast of a module, and I’m under no illusions as to how much work I’m going to need to put in. Structuring my life is going to be incredibly important over the next few months, so that I have time to spend with my husband, my friends and my family – not to mention the me-time that will be spent doing yoga and pole dancing.

But last year was fiercely busy, and I enjoyed it immensely. So I’m not fazed; and in fact, I can’t wait. Bring on 2012. I’m ready for you.

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2 responses to “Starting S216: Environmental Science

  1. ‘Ang on a minute..!

    re: “See – the northern hemisphere is puny in terms of landmass size compared to the south.”

    No it’s not! There’s loads more landmass in the north!

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